#mathsTLP 15th March 2015

To begin with, here are 4 generic starters:

Data Starter

Algebra Starter

Shape Starter

Number Starter

All in a handy PowerPoint (with answers) here Starters W2

Data questions inspired by http://matharguments180.blogspot.co.uk/

Lesson 1: Simultaneous Equations

Don Steward

Picture10

NCETM Resource

simeq2

Simultaneous Equation Sudoku

ses

A worksheet I made:

Simultaneous Equations_graphs

ws

Post from Resourceaholic

Cooperative Simultaneous Equations Activity

Lesson 2: Traveling Salesman Problem

 Mr Barton Maths (PPoint)

NRICH

nr

General Graph Theory Teaching Activities

gth

Lesson 3: Post Test Lesson Ideas

Revision Lesson Ideas

QR Code Revision

NCETM Ideas

rev6rev8  rev4 rev3 rev2

Lesson 4: Circle Theorems

Post from Resourceahloic

Paper plates

Don Steward Resources

Picture2

Lesson 5: C4 Integration

MathCentre

integ

Consequences game (blog post)

trigbits

CAKZPkZWMAErFKm

Lesson 6: SOHCAHTOA

Blog post from Resourceaholic

Don Steward trig

Don Steward Resources

0001s

Explanations of what Sine, Cosine

and Tan actually are

250px-unitcircledefs-svg

Lesson 7: Plotting Quadratic Graphs

Basic worksheet

quad silhouettes

quadrat

Match My Parabola (Desmos)

desmos

Tough Question from Five Triangles:

Lesson 8: Equations of Parallel and Perpendicular Lines

National Stem Centre

Mr Barton Maths

Barton Maths

Desmos Graph Challenge

dgc

Idea from James Pearce:

CAKYvhaWEAAR_EQ

Generic A Level help and websites:

MathCentre Resources

General A Level Resources (RISP)

General A Level teaching hints (blog post)

Integral Maths site

PlusMaths

MathsCareers

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6 thoughts on “#mathsTLP 15th March 2015

  1. First, the letters x and y are at best being used as specific unknowns rather than variables – which provides a very restricted view of algebra. Second, it’s arguable whether the letters are being seen as numbers at all, rather than simply as names or labels for the two shapes. We are very close here to ‘a stands for apple, b for banana’, ie to fruit salad algebra.
    Of course, it is important to confront these ideas, because they arise so easily, but we doubt whether that was the authors’ intention. The resource is a sobering example of the dangers of trying to make maths ‘easy’ for students – the maths gets filtered out and replaced by a dubious pseudo-maths.

  2. Pingback: #mathsTLP 22nd March 2015 | Solve My Maths

  3. Pingback: #mathsTLP 29th March 2015 | Solve My Maths

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